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COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic caused significant disruptions to virtually all aspects of oncology care. There has been a steep drop in cancer diagnoses and screenings—a result of shelter-in-place policies instituted early on, as well as ongoing patient fears about returning to healthcare facilities for new appointments or follow-up care.
During the COVID-19 pandemic, oncology nurses have been the cornerstone of healthcare services, whether they are on the front lines offering compassionate care or in a leadership role developing and implementing new policies to promote better patient outcomes.
For decades, healthcare professionals have worked diligently to teach individuals that screening is a valuable tool for preventing and detecting cancer. This has not been an easy mission, and nurses and physicians have had to debunk the myths, bias, and misinformation that deter patients from getting screened annually or according to specific guidelines set forth by organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Cancer Society (ACS).
The COVID-19 pandemic is stretching into its fifth month in the United States, and patient advocacy groups continue to focus on providing the necessary support and services to patients with cancer.
Oncology nurses and nurse navigators are positioned on the front lines of care, playing an integral role in patients’ battles against cancer.
The COVID-19 pandemic will have far-reaching economic implications in the United States and abroad for the foreseeable future. During this session, Murray Aitken, MBA, Director, IQVIA Institute, presented emerging data regarding some of the ways in which the pandemic is affecting the US economy.
Burt Zweigenhaft, PhD, D.Litt, Founder, Association for Value-Based Cancer Care, moderated a panel session in which 3 experts from the independent actuarial firm, Milliman, discussed recent data showing the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may affect the future of healthcare.
The federal government is an active participant in shaping and delivering healthcare policy. The panelists in this session addressed the government’s response to COVID-19 and weighed in on some of the issues that their agencies frequently encountered as medical practices grapple with the new normal.
Nurses are on the front lines like no other healthcare personnel. In this panel, distinguished nursing professionals discussed topics and issues that have arisen during the pandemic. Led by healthcare educator Lillie D. Shockney, the comprehensive panel covered some of the myriad issues nurse navigators confront now, including rising cancer rates in an aging population, and a decline in numbers of oncology nurses and oncologists.
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