TON - September 2011 Vol 4, No 6

TON - September 2011 Vol 4, No 6 published on September 16, 2011

Golf balls may be small, but if struck by one, you would know that they have tremendous impact. So it was in the beginning of the Play for P.I.N.K. (PFP) organization when a small group of women proved to make a huge impact on funding for breast cancer research.

TON - September 2011 Vol 4, No 6 published on September 16, 2011

Thanks for taking the time to speak to us, Ernie. Can you tell us what motivated you to organize a P.I.N.K. event?

Ernie McCarren (EM): As a breast cancer survivor and as director of business development for MAMM, a magazine for women with breast cancer, I became keenly aware of the critical need for funding to support research to bring new and better therapies to market faster. By partnering with Play for P.I.N.K., we know that 100% of the funds that we raise will go directly to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF).

TON - September 2011 Vol 4, No 6 published on September 16, 2011 in Survivorship

Our research suggests that health education programs such as SHARE may have an important impact on improving bone health behaviors among adolescent survivors of childhood cancer,” lead author Darren Mays, PhD, MPH, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, tells the Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators.

TON - September 2011 Vol 4, No 6 published on September 16, 2011 in Navigation

Because cancer patients vary in their needs for cancer services, patients vary in the amount of navigation time they require. On a patient-by-patient basis, however, navigators congruously estimated the navigation intensity, and therefore the time requirement, that would be needed, reveals a first-of-its-kind study.

Results from an important phase 3 trial presented at the plenary session of the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) could lead to prolonged treatment with adjuvant imatinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs).

The extension of imatinib treatment to 3 years, compared with the usual 1 year, resulted in a 54% reduced risk of recurrence and 55% reduced risk of death within 5 years for patients with high-risk disease, reported Heikki Joensuu, MD, of Helsinki University Central Hospital in Finland.

TON - September 2011 Vol 4, No 6 published on September 16, 2011 in Your FAQs…Answered!

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a neoplastic disease characterized by the accumulation of monoclonal lymphocytes in blood, bone marrow, and lymphoid tissue.1 It is the most common form of leukemia in adults worldwide, with prevalence increasing with age.

TON - September 2011 Vol 4, No 6 published on September 16, 2011 in Supportive Care

The setting is an 18th-century palace, Schloss Leopoldskron, and the adjoining Meierhof building. This is the home of the Salzburg Global Seminar, an international institution that challenges current and future leaders to develop creative ideas and innovative strategies for solving universal problems.

TON - September 2011 Vol 4, No 6 published on September 15, 2011 in Cancer Center Profile

After the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, Chicago became one of the fastest growing cities in the world. But in this time of prosperity and growth, the prognosis for children born in the city was grim. A child had only a 50% chance of surviving to the age of 5 years, and those who survived were likely to be exposed to a host of diseases. In 1882, Julia Foster Porter, a young widow who also lost a child to disease, took bold steps to transform the future of children’s health in Chicago.

CHICAGO—The population of cancer survivors is growing rapidly. More than 12 million Americans are alive after a cancer diagnosis, with most living at least 5 years, and 16% living 20 years after their initial diagnosis.

This growing population of cancer survivors is at risk for many comorbid health conditions, especially as they age. A study of 10,397 childhood cancer survivors found this group to be 8 times more likely to have a severe or life-threatening condition than their siblings (Oeffinger K, et al. N Engl J Med. 2006;355:1572-1582).

TON - September 2011 Vol 4, No 6 published on September 15, 2011 in Supportive Care

For the past 15 years, the Josh and Friends Project has been an enduring source of comfort to children aged between 2 and 9 years, who face anxieties related to medical procedures, surgery, chemotherapy, or other treatments arising from illness or injury. Founded by Knoxville, Tennessee, veterinarian Randy Lange, the Josh and Friends Project captures the inimitable qualities of the human–animal bond to influence positively a child’s psychologic and physiologic outlook in anticipation of as well as throughout medical treatment and recovery.

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