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Prostate Cancer

Oral relugolix given daily is superior to standard an­drogen-­deprivation therapy (ADT) with leuprolide (Lupron) in men with advanced prostate cancer, according to the results of the phase 3 HERO study, which were reported at the ASCO 2020 virtual annual meeting and published online before the meeting (Shore ND, et al. N Engl J Med. 2020;382:2187-2196).
Early results from the phase 2 TheraP clinical trial show that the targeted radiation therapy 177Lutetium PSMA-617 (Lu-PSMA) significantly improved prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response compared with standard cabazitaxel in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) that progressed after docetaxel therapy.
The American Society of Clinical Oncology, in partnership with the European Association of Urology, the American Urological Association, and the College of American Pathologists, published a set of recommendations that offers further guide prostate cancer management.
On May 19, 2020, the FDA approved a new indication for olaparib (Lynparza; AstraZeneca), a PARP inhibitor, for the treatment of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and deleterious or suspected deleterious germline or somatic HRR mutation, as determined by an FDA-approved test, whose disease progressed after enzalutamide (Xtandi) or abiraterone acetate (Zytiga) therapy. Olaparib is the first FDA-approved PARP inhibitor for prostate cancer.
San Francisco, CA—Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning targeted to detect prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is poised to overtake conventional imaging, according to presentations at the 2020 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium.
Prostate cancer, the second most common type of cancer in men, is expected to affect 11.6% of all men during their lifetime. In fact, more than 3 million men in the United States are living with prostate cancer. It is estimated that in 2017, 161,360 men were newly diagnosed with prostate cancer, and 26,730 men died from the disease.
Prostate cancer is the third most common type of cancer in the United States, after breast cancer and lung cancer. In 2018 alone, 164,690 individuals were diagnosed with prostate cancer, accounting for nearly 10% of all new cancer cases, and 29,430 deaths were attributed to the disease. Prostate cancer is most frequently diagnosed in men aged 65 to 74 years (median age, 66 years). More than 98% of patients with prostate cancer survive ≥5 years; however, the 5-year survival rate drops to 30% for patients with metastatic disease.
Munich, Germany—For patients with newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer, current standard management is androgen-deprivation therapy plus docetaxel (Taxotere). Contrary to previous assumptions, radiation to the primary tumor improves survival in men with low metastatic disease burden. This new finding came from the preplanned analysis of the multiarm, multistage STAMPEDE study presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress by lead investigator Chris C. Parker, MD, FRCR, MRCP, Consultant Clinical Oncologist, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, England. The study was simultaneously published online in Lancet.1
Chicago, IL—In the United States, black men are twice as likely to die from prostate cancer as white men, and they are often diagnosed at a younger age and at later stages of the disease.
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