Supportive Care

A preliminary report of a meta-analysis of clinical trials of molecularly targeted therapies shows that they are not benign and can add to the toxicity of standard chemotherapy. In particular, increased rates of oral mucositis and diarrhea are reported with several US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved agents. Increased mucositis seen with bevacizumab and erlotinib does not appear to be clinically significant, but severe diarrhea occurs with a number of targeted agents and has a potential impact on quality of life (QOL) and healthcare resource utilization.

Read More ›

A program conducted at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, improved oncology nurses’ awareness of dyspnea in patients with advanced cancer. Sarah Kang, RN, MSN, described the program at the 37th Annual Congress of the Oncology Nursing Society.

Read More ›

An automated computer-based telephone remote monitoring system with a built-in follow-up component involving nurse practitioners (NPs) appears to be feasible and effective for managing cancer patients’ unrelieved symptoms following chemotherapy. A study presented at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology showed that use of this system during chemotherapy cut the number of days with severe symptoms by two-thirds and the number of moderate symptom days by half, at the same time increasing the number of asymptomatic days and mild symptom days.

Read More ›

Use of Bone-Modifying Agents in Oncology Patients

With advances in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, the estimated 5-year survival rate for cancer patients has significantly improved to approximately 67%.1 The most common malignancies in men and women in the United States—breast and prostate cancers— have 2 of the highest 5-year survival rates reported, at 90% and 99%, respectively.1 As oncology patients are living longer, bone health has become a pertinent issue in the treatment of both metastatic and nonmetastatic oncology patients.2

Read More ›

Outpatient management of febrile neutropenia is appropriate for carefully selected lowrisk patients, according to Ashley Morris Engemann, PharmD, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, who spoke at the 2012 Pharmacy Program held in Hollywood, Florida, during the 17th Annual Conference of the National Comp - rehensive Cancer Network (NCCN).

Engemann noted that treating patients at home is clearly the patient’s preference and is cost saving.

Read More ›

The mighty green spear of the asparagus is a welcome sign of spring. This nutrient-packed vegetable has been harvested for more than 2500 years and has been highly regarded as a promoter of health and wellness.1 Asparagus has been a staple for many different people of different cultures around the world for its taste as well as its proposed medicinal properties. Read More ›


The link between cancer and thrombosis has been known for many years. Recently this connection has come to the forefront with increased recognition by healthcare providers and mandates by governing bodies. The results of a thromboembolic event can be catastrophic in a patient with cancer. Read More ›


Spring is upon us, and with it comes the prospect of new beginnings with flowers blooming and trees, plants, and bushes budding with the fruits and vegetables of the season. The warm breeze of spring brings motivation to start the “spring cleaning” of our diets. There is no better way to shape up a diet than to start incorporating more cruciferous vegetables into the diet.

Read More ›

Pain is a frequent and pervasive problem for older persons with cancer, affecting approximately 80% of this population.Treating older adults with cancer can be complex because of the presence of comorbid conditions that may impact chronic pain.2 Once pain is identified and the cause is known, it is sometimes necessary to target specific pain mechanisms.3 Hence, a comprehensive assessment of each individual patient is essential in order to identify all of the conditions contributing to pain. 

Read More ›

Oophorectomy in younger women leads to decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and a higher prevalence of arthritis, according to a study reported at the 2011 CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. 

Read More ›

Page 8 of 13


Subscribe to The Oncology Nurse-APN/PA

To sign up for our newsletter or print publications, enter your contact information below.

I'd like to receive: