Supportive Care

Quinoa, the ancient “grain” of the Andes, cultivated for over 7000 years, has transitioned itself into our present-day kitchens and the title of a modern-day superfood. The Incas believed quinoa to be a sacred food and referred to the “grain” as the “mother seed.” Many years later, this superfood would make its way to the United States, where its popularity continues to grow as its numerous nutritional benefits are spotlighted.

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Mediterranean White Bean and Lentil Salad

Ingredients

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Take the chill out of winter with the nutrient-packed goodness of lentils. These tiny members of the legume family may be small in size but are big on nutrition. Lentils are loaded with vitamins, minerals, fiber, and protein. They also contain antioxidants and phytonutrients—naturally occurring plant compounds that help prevent damage to cells throughout the body. Lentils are so versatile that they can be made into a variety of different dishes, from appetizers and side dishes to main meals and desserts.

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The red, golden, and candy cane beets are the perfect addition to any winter menu. Beets are the ideal vegetable to incorporate into your winter meals to add immune-boosting, phytonutrient-rich compounds into your diet. With the cold and flu season upon us, it is time to look to the foods we eat as a weapon and take advantage of their potential to keep us healthy.

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Roasted Beet and Grilled Asparagus Salad With Orange Tarragon Sour Cream

Ingredients

1 bunch asparagus
1 tablespoon canola oil
1 tablespoon chopped thyme
1 bunch beets
2 oranges, juice and zest
2 oranges, halved and sliced
1 tablespoon fresh, chopped tarragon
4 tablespoons low-fat sour cream
1 bunch leeks, cut into strips and blanched

1.Roast beets in a 350-degree oven for 45 minutes. Peel while still warm and let cool. Cut into slices.

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Cancer and its treatments can cause sexual side effects, and oncology nurses are often in the best position to bring up the topic and provide useful information as well as emotional support. The most important thing a nurse can do to help patients is to initiate the discussion.

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There has been increasing recognition of the importance of cultural competence in caring for patients and in improving patient outcomes. This subject was explored by Wael Al Zayyer, PhD, Executive Consultant at the King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Damman, Saudi Arabia, during the 12th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Institute of Learning.

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Many cancer survivors who thought they were fertile now may be finding that is not the case. New research is suggesting that current estimates of the impact of chemotherapy on women’s reproductive health are too low.

Researchers at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) say their analysis of the age-specific, longterm effects of chemotherapy provides new insights that will help patients and clinicians make more informed decisions about future reproductive options, such as egg harvesting (Cancer. September 1, 2011. Epub ahead of print).

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The cool, crisp air and the vibrant sea of red, orange, and yellow that decorate our landscapes are the inviting signs that fall has arrived. Among the most common symbols of fall is the pumpkin. At this time of year, this winter squash is usually adorned with a spooky face and potato ears—however, the jack-o-lantern is not the pumpkin’s only claim to fame. Read More ›


The setting is an 18th-century palace, Schloss Leopoldskron, and the adjoining Meierhof building. This is the home of the Salzburg Global Seminar, an international institution that challenges current and future leaders to develop creative ideas and innovative strategies for solving universal problems. Read More ›


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